My Favorite Garden Books…a Series of Sorts

When I go to a garden book, it’s usually to find an answer about specific features of a plant.  With that in mind, it’s no wonder that my favorite book is actually a series of books, connected in one way or another to the University of Illinois.  As you read down through the list, sometimes…

Dreamin’ of Green Grass

I’ve been fortunate over the years to travel to other states to learn about various aspects of tree and turf care and transfer the technology and research results to the residents of Nebraska.  It’s amazing how many similarities there are.  Sure, the plants are different, and the care is a bit unique, but fertilization, pruning,…

Ice Melters in the Landscape

In Nebraska, ice melt product application is a necessary evil, however steps can be taken to minimize damage to landscape plants.

The Dirt on Dirt

So what is it with dirt anyway?  Dirt, otherwise known as soil, is either greatly loved by gardeners or the source of endless complaints. In recognition of World Soil Day, let’s tip our hats to this much maligned, often disrespected, contributor to plant growth. One clear thing about soil—if it’s a healthy soil, then there…

I am Thankful

John Fech explains the multitude of things he is thankful for, including Nebraska Extension, the Gro Big Red team and Master Gardeners.

Winterizing Your Lawn

Don’t let the lawn go to pot; give it just a little more care before the snow flies

When Plants Attack—Giant Ragweed and Poison Ivy

Think plants can only take abuse, not dish it out?  Then you’ve never encountered unrelenting ragweed allergies or a nice case of poison ivy rash.  These plants are no shrinking violets! Giant ragweed, Ambrosia trifida, is an annual plant and a member of the Aster family.  You know, the same family that brings us the…

Voracious Vigorous Voles

They look like mice with short tails, but what problems do voles pose for our landscapes? These guys are granivores, so people that feed birds will naturally have more voles in their yard because bird seed is a whole bunch of grain that falls to the ground as the birds partake. It’s the fallen grain…