Storm Damage in Fruit and Vegetable Gardens

Storm damage to fruits and vegetables can take various forms.  From broken limbs in fruit trees to hail damage on fruits and vegetables or flooding raising food safety concerns, severe weather can have significant effects for the health and productivity of the garden.  Some damage will require maintenance, while other warrants a wait-and-see approach.  Here’s a list of some common types of damage to fruits and vegetables and what you should do (or shouldn’t do) about it.

Storm Damaged Trees—How Much Damage Is Too Much?

The June 16 windstorm and tornado activity wreaked havoc on area trees.  Trees that are snapped in two are obvious candidates for removal, but what about those trees that lost a large limb and the rest of the tree is intact?  Should those trees be removed or can they be saved? An excellent example is…

Telephone Pole Tree

You will often hear the virtues of proper tree planting depth.  Trees that are planted to deep will often fail to thrive, appear stunted and not grow.  However, this is not always the case.  Many instances when a tree is planted to deep will have no outward signs of stress.  How do you know if…

Cleaning up storm-damaged trees

Wow.  The heavy duty wind and rainstorm that blew through the Omaha metro area on Friday June 16th caused lots of damage to shade and fruit trees.  Many, many good specimens were damaged or lost altogether.  Clients have reported damage to large and small trees, decks, gutters and fences, which emphasizes the issue of “target”…

Pollinators and the food we eat

It has been well-established and well-discussed that pollinators are responsible for the production (and reproduction) of about 35 percent of the crops that we grow for consumption.  While most of the staple crops like corn and wheat are wind pollinated and don’t require a pollinator, our diet is much more varied and interesting thanks to…

National Pollinator Week: Soldier Beetles

What a happy combination—soldier beetles and butter daisies! The soldier beetle, Chauliognathus spp., is a ½ inch long insect that gets its name from its wing covers, which resemble a uniform. It may remind you of the lighting bug, and rightly so, since they are related. Both the larvae and adults of soldier beetles feed…

Eryngium planum – Sea Holly

Happy Pollinator Week! What an amazing time to celebrate pollinators.  We know that insects play a vital role in our ecosystem.  But did you know almost every third bite of food you take comes from a plant that has been pollinated by an insect.  Wow! Pollinators are out and about all season long from early…