The First Thanksgiving: A feast of native and local foods

Turkey, dressing (or stuffing, depending on where you put it or what you call it), potatoes, fresh bread rolls and pumpkin pie are the traditional fare for the celebration these days, but they are a far cry from what the original feast shared by the pilgrims and American Indians would have featured.

Bringing in Houseplants

For gardeners like me, it’s tough to think about the Fall ritual of bringing in houseplants from outdoors because it is an acknowledgement that winter is coming. On the other hand, the houseplants are gorgeous right now and having them inside this winter will be cheering. So here are some things to keep in mind…

Gardeners Beware: Watering Tools

Recently I purchased a gardening wand for watering my garden and container plants.  In tiny lettering along the length of the wand are these words “Note: The brass in this product contains lead. Warning: This product contains one or more chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other…

National Food Bank Day, September 1, 2017

Happy National Food Bank Day!  Many local food banks appreciate donations of dollars and non-perishable food items, but did you know you can donate extras from your vegetable garden too? The H.O.P.E. Project, Helping Omaha’s People Eat, is a service project run by Nebraska Extension Master Gardeners of Douglas-Sarpy Counties, and provides fresh produce to…

Fall Seed Starting—Enlist the Help of a Board!

Now is the time to plant your fall vegetable crops.  Seeds of lettuce, spinach, carrots, peas, beets, kale, and radishes are some of the options.  With daytime temperatures in the 80’s, however, it can be tough keeping the seeds evenly moist so they can germinate.  A simple and low-cost way to remedy this is with…

IPM: An Ounce of Pest Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

Perhaps the right question to ask is not about what to spray but about how to prevent the problem in the first place, and to take the advice of Ben Franklin that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  It’s a philosophy we call Integrated Pest Management. The secret is planning ahead, instead of waiting for problems to present themselves.